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Trauma care during times of conflict: Strategic targeting of medical resources & operational logistics to save more lives

  • Matthew Sauder
    Affiliations
    NSU NOVA Southeastern University School of Allopathic Medicine, Fort Lauderdale, FL, USA
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  • Lucy Kornblith
    Affiliations
    Department of Surgery, Division of Trauma and Surgical Critical Care, Zuckerberg San Francisco General Hospital and Trauma Center, San Francisco, CA, USA

    University of San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, USA
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  • Jennifer Gurney
    Affiliations
    US Army Institute of Surgical Research and the DoD Joint Trauma System, San Antonio, TX, USA
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  • Adel Elkbuli
    Correspondence
    Correspondence author at: Department of Surgery, Division of Trauma and Surgical Critical Care, Orlando Regional Medical Center, Orlando, FL, USA, 86 W Underwood St., Orlando, FL 32806, USA.
    Affiliations
    Department of Surgery, Division of Trauma and Surgical Critical Care, Orlando Regional Medical Center, Orlando, FL, USA, 86 W Underwood St., Orlando, FL 32806, USA

    Department of Surgical Education, Orlando Regional Medical Center, Orlando, FL, USA
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Published:November 08, 2022DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.injury.2022.11.017
      With the current international conflicts, including the Russian-Ukraine conflict, it is a critical time to call upon decades of research and evidence-based strategies to optimize trauma care delivery. The aim of this correspondence is to review evidence distinct to trauma care during conflict.
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