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Paper| Volume 22, ISSUE 4, P323-325, July 1991

Comparison of management outcome of primary and secondary referred patients with traumatic extradural haematoma in a neurosurgical unit

  • W.S. Poon
    Affiliations
    Department of Surgery, Prince of Wales Hospital, Chinese University of Hong Kong Hong Kong
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  • A.K.C. Li
    Correspondence
    Requests for reprints should be addressed to: Professor Arthur K. C. Li, Department of Surgery, Prince of Wales Hospital, Chinese University of Hong Kong, Shatin, Hong Kong.
    Affiliations
    Department of Surgery, Prince of Wales Hospital, Chinese University of Hong Kong Hong Kong
    Search for articles by this author
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      Abstract

      A total of 104 patients with a traumatic extradural haematoma in a 5-year period were studied. The mortality of the 71 patients managed primarily by the neurosurgical unit was less than that of the 33 patients secondarily transferred from the district general hospital: 4 per cent vs 24 per cent. This better result was associated with a shorter delay between the time of conscious level deterioration and decompressive operation: 0.7 ± 1.0 h vs 3.2 ± 0.5 h. Direct admission of all head injured patients to a neurosurgical unit resulted in significant reduction in mortality and morbidity in patients with an extradural haematoma.
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